5 Reasons the Beauceron Might Be the Right Dog Breed for You

Beauceron dog
Alice Van Kempen, Animal Photography
If your idea of fun is snoozing on the couch all day, the Beauceron probably isn't the dog for you. This breed usually likes to be active and may find (destructive) things to do if left to his own devices.

The Beauceron, a shorthaired French herding breed, is generally a confident, smart and strong-willed dog. He tends to be independent (OK, stubborn) and is best-suited for an experienced dog owner. Learn more about the dog breed and whether he might be the right one for you.

They tend to be high-energy.

Generally an active dog, the Beauceron usually enjoys daily exercise like running and hiking. He’s well-suited to most dog sports, including agility, flyball, herding, obedience, rally, search and rescue and tracking. Just remember to talk with your veterinarian before starting a new exercise program for your dog.

They're often easy to train.

The Beauceron is generally an intelligent dog who learns quickly. Begin socialization and training early and use positive reinforcement techniques like play, praise and food rewards. Just remember that he can be an independent thinker and he may test boundaries and push back when you ask him to do something — plan to be fair, firm and consistent with him.

They can make good watchdogs.

The Beauceron tends to be loyal to his people. He has the size (he can stand 24 to 27.5 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 80 and 110 pounds) and ability to defend his home and family if needed.

They can be mouthy.

Be sure you have plenty of tough toys on hand for the Beauceron to carry around and chew on and don’t let him gnaw on your hands, feet or other body parts.

They tend to have a strong prey drive.

The Beauceron can get along with indoor cats if they have been raised together. However, he’ll likely chase cats and other small animals outdoors. He may also be aggressive toward dogs or other animals he doesn’t know. He can also get along with children if he’s raised with them, but don’t forget that he’s a herding breed and may chase or nip at them — this should never be permitted. He’s best suited to a family with older children who can understand how to treat him with respect.

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