Pet Scoop: Cat Café Opens in New York, Bartender Gets $1,000 Tip for Dog’s Surgery

April 24, 2014: We've scoured the Web to find the best and most compelling animal stories, videos and photos. And it's all right here.

A cat sits in the window at New York's pop-up Cat Cafe.
AP
A cat sits in the window at New York's pop-up Cat Cafe.
Purina One Cat Café Opens

Sixteen adoptable cats from the country’s largest no-kill shelter are ready to greet customers at New York City’s first Cat Café when it opens this morning. The pop-up café — which will only be open for four days — was created by Purina One and the North Shore Animal League. Patrons can order espresso drinks and pastries in a 600-square-foot area, and go to enjoy them in a separate, larger space where they can indulge in some kitty company. They can also listen to a lineup of speakers on feline health, including cat lover and Dancing With the Stars judge Carrie Ann Inaba. Cat cafés are popular in Paris, London and Tokyo, but the only other place to sip a coffee at a café with felines in the U.S. is in San Francisco. The goal of finding forever homes for the cats seems to be working — a cameraman who was there to film on Wednesday stepped up to adopt one before the place even opened for business. — Read it at the New York Post and meet the cats from the North Shore Animal League

Whales Make Duck-Like Sounds in Ocean

Scientists who’ve been baffled by low-frequency sounds that occur every winter in the Southern Hemisphere in the ocean around Antarctica think they’ve solved the mystery. The duck-like sounds are being made by whales. The deep, repeated sounds were only heard between October and December each year, and only in a limited area. An analysis led by Denise Risch, a marine acoustic specialist at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center, found that the noises referred to as “bio-duck calls” were coming from massive Antarctic minke whales. The migrating animals use the sounds to call to each other when they return to the Antarctic each year to breed. The findings were published in the journal Biology Letters. — Read it at National Geographic

Sloth Stomachs Are Made to Hang Upside Down

A new study finds that three-toed sloths have unique adhesions that keep their liver, stomach and kidneys in place, so their lungs aren’t compressed while they spend their days hanging upside down in trees. The animals, which live in the forests of South and Central America, spend much of their lifetime hanging from their hind legs to reach leaves from the tips of branches, and to groom. "These seemingly innocuous adhesions are likely to be important in the animal's energy budget and survival," said the study. This study was also published in the journal Biology Letters. — Read it from AFP via Paw Nation

Christina Summitt, a bartender at a New Jersey Holiday Inn, got a $1,000 tip from a customer who wanted to help pay for her dog's surgery.
Christina Summitt, a bartender at a New Jersey Holiday Inn, got a $1,000 tip from a customer who wanted to help pay for her dog's surgery.

Man Leaves $1,000 Tip to Help Dog

While she was bartending at a Holiday Inn in New Jersey on Saturday night, Christina Summitt started chatting with a friendly couple who asked her about the paw-print tattoo on her wrist. Summitt told them about her volunteer work with a dog rescue group, and eventually revealed that she was worried about her own dog, Tucker, who was at a veterinary hospital having emergency surgery after swallowing a plastic ball. They discussed how expensive the surgery was going to be, and Summitt, who works three jobs, said she’d do whatever she had to do for her adopted Great Dane and black Lab mix. When the man paid the $80 bill, Summitt was shocked to find that he’d added a $1,000 tip. Summitt told him she couldn’t accept it, but the man told her to put it toward her dog’s medical costs. “I walked around and hugged this couple. They said, 'We'll be praying for Tucker,'" Summitt said. "I would also love nothing more than to publicly thank this couple in front of the world.” The couple has remained anonymous, and Tucker is now recovering at home. — Read it from CNN

Blind Bunny and Pal Get Adopted

The Utah-based Best Friends Animal Society shared the sweet story of bunnies Cooper and Scout on Facebook on Wednesday. Cooper, who’s described as a snuggler, has cataracts so badly that he can’t see. Luckily he has the help of his loyal friend Scout, his guide bunny, who leads him around and always sticks by his side. The pair lost their home because their owner was allergic to them, but they’ll soon be headed to a new life in Pennsylvania with adopter Kandi McCleary. She plans to drive to Utah to get the bunnies, but until then, they’re living with her daughter, Jade, who works at Best Friends. — Read it from Best Friends

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