Pet Scoop: Churchill’s Estate Adopts 6th Marmalade Cat, Iditarod Vet Wins Again

March 12, 2014: We've scoured the Web to find the best and most compelling animal stories, videos and photos. And it's all right here.

Jock VI was rescued from a shelter to become the latest marmalade cat to reside at Winston Churchill's former estate.
Jock VI was rescued from a shelter to become the latest marmalade cat to reside at Winston Churchill's former estate.

Jock VI Adopted at Chartwell

A 7-month-old marmalade shelter kitten in the U.K. got the rescue of a lifetime. Malley, who was renamed Jock VI, is now living at Chartwell, the former country estate of the nation’s wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill. For Churchill’s 88th birthday in 1962, one of his private secretaries, Sir John “Jock” Colville, gave him a marmalade kitten, who he named Jock. The kitten was so special to Churchill that when he died nearly 50 year ago, he requested that there always be a marmalade cat with a white bib, four white paws and the name Jock living at Chartwell, which he left to the National Trust. The organization announced the arrival of Jock VI via Twitter on Tuesday. He was adopted from the rescue Croydon Animal Samaritans and loves his afternoon naps, eating tuna and lounging on the estate’s Persian rugs. His dislikes? Bright lights, being left alone and listening to opera. — Read it at the U.K.’s Independent

Dallas Seavey Wins Second Iditarod

The musher’s victory in the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Tuesday was so strange that he said he didn’t even realize he’d won the race until 90 seconds after he crossed the finish line. Dallas Seavey was in third place until a sudden storm blew through, knocking the front-runner out of the competition and keeping the second-place musher minutes away from her first win. It was a record-breaking win for Seavey, who was the youngest ever to win the race in 2012. This year, he finished in 8 days, 13 hours, 4 minutes and 19 seconds, breaking a record set in 2011. Last year, Seavey’s father, Mitch Seavey, broke a record of his own when he became the oldest winner of the 1,000-mile trek across Alaska. — Read it at USA Today

Chimps Trust Some People More Than Chimps

A new study finds that chimps who have had positive experiences with humans seem to trust people more than they trust baboons or chimpanzees who they don’t know. The research shows that chimps can bond with and show empathy for members of another species, and develop a trust for them on a subconscious level. "I think that they may have been conditioned to think that humans are generally okay," said lead author Matthew Campbell of the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. "Therefore, meeting a new human may be an opportunity for a new positive interaction, since that has been their experience." The study was published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. — Read it at Discovery News

Three critically endangered Dama gazelles were born last month at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.
Dolores Reed, Smithsonian's National Zoo
Three critically endangered Dama gazelles were born last month at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.

Three Rare Dama Gazelles Born

Over the course of a week in February, three male Dama gazelle calves were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) in Virginia. At 24 hours, one of the calves weighed 11 pounds and the two others were 12 pounds each. The rarest of all gazelles, the animals are critically endangered, with less than 500 of them left in the wild. Dama gazelles are native to northern Africa, and are now only found in Chad, Mali and Niger. The SCBI, which is affiliated with the National Zoo, is working to maintain the species’ population. — Read it from the National Zoo

Homeless Family Who Kept Pit Bull Finds a Home

A California family who chose homelessness over abandoning their Pit Bull has a new, dog-friendly apartment. Carol Devia, her husband, Peter, and her adult sons lived out of their car for a year while they tried to find a landlord who would accept their Pit Bull, Rocco, and their Lab mix. Finally, one landlord saw a story about the family on a Facebook page for a Pit Bull advocacy group and offered them a place to live in the San Francisco Bay Area. “Thanks to the Pit Bull community who came together, we have a place,” said Carol Devia. — Read it at ABC News

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