Pet Scoop: Twin Bear Cubs Rescued at Lake Tahoe, Tiny Dog Saves Family From Fire

June 30, 2014: We've scoured the Web to find the best and most compelling animal stories, videos and photos. And it's all right here.

Two abandoned black bear cubs were rescued and brought to the Lake Tahoe Wildlife Center.
Two abandoned black bear cubs were rescued and brought to the Lake Tahoe Wildlife Center.

Bear Cubs Recover in California

Baby black bears Conway 1 and Conway 2 arrived at the Lake Tahoe Wildlife Center Tuesday after they were rescued by game wardens at Conway Summit in California. The wardens were concerned because they kept seeing the brothers without their mother and thought they must have been abandoned. They trapped the cubs and brought them to the center, where they’re getting a special bear formula. They brothers like to box each other and challenge each other for food. On Saturday, they were introduced to two other rescue cubs. Meyers is recovering after being hit by a car in the town of Meyers, and Tahoe made headlines when she was dropped off at the center in April. At the time, she weighed just 5 pounds but she’s now up to 22 pounds. Socializing the cubs together will make it easier to return them to the wild in about 7 months. — Watch it at USA Today and see the cubs on live webcams

Emperor Penguin Population Expected to Drop

A new report predicts that climate change in Antarctica will result in a decline in the number of emperor penguins. There are now about 600,000 of the birds in the area, but scientists say their numbers will drop by about a fifth by 2100 as the sea ice they breed on becomes less secure. "It's not happy news for the emperor penguin," said Hal Castellan of the U.S. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, a co-author of the study. Although the penguins’ population is expected to rise slightly by 2050, the report is urging governments to list the birds as endangered. The study was published in the journal Nature Climate Change. — Read it from Reuters via Yahoo

Bird Who May Have Inspired “Rio” Dies

A rare Spix’s macaw named Presley, who’s believed to have inspired the animated 2011 movie “ Rio,” died Wednesday in Brazil at around age 40. The blue parrot was thought to be the second-to-last of his species born in the wild. Presley didn’t have any offspring. The native Brazilian birds are critically endangered and thought to be extinct in the wild, thanks to deforestation and wildlife trafficking. There are fewer than 100 of the macaws in captive breeding programs and refuges around the world. — Read it at National Geographic

Beachgoers help authorities carry a stranded manatee back to the water in Florida.
Beachgoers help authorities carry a stranded manatee back to the water in Florida.

Beachgoers Help Stranded Manatee

With direction from authorities, volunteers and bystanders at a Florida beach came to the aid of a female manatee who was stranded in the sand Wednesday morning. The crowd at Disappearing Island at Ponce Inlet put up a tent to give the manatee shade and kept her moist with water until Florida Fish and Wildlife biologists arrived on the scene. The biologists inspected and tagged her, then carefully lifted her onto a stretcher. More than a dozen volunteers helped carry the stretcher back to the water, where she was released. If you spot a manatee or sea turtle in trouble, you should call the state’s Fish and Wildlife authorities. — Read it at Huffington Post

Chihuahua Saves Family From Fire

A family in Washington state is crediting its Chihuahua named Chloe with saving them from a house fire last week. The little dog started barking when she noticed the smoke and didn’t stop until the three people in the home woke up. They made it out, but Chloe was trapped inside when part of the building collapsed. The family feared the worst for Chloe but firefighters found her alive in the rubble an hour later. "She's got 250 pounds in that little 4-pound body," said Chloe's owner, Tracie Fox. "No doubt she saved us." — Read it at People Pets

More on


Join the Conversation

Like this article? Have a point of view to share? Let us know!