This Vet's Take on the 10 Things Your Pet Won’t Tell You

Scottish Fold cat wearing an expression that's hard to read.
Thinkstock

Think you know your pet’s every unspoken wish? Think again. Your pet is unlikely to be capable of communicating her wants and needs in ways you might assume she would. Even those of you most in touch with your pets' feelings are likely missing a few cues here and there.

As a veterinarian, I’m more than aware of some of those communication gaps. It’s not as if I’m perfect in assessing my own pets' thoughts and feelings (ain’t none of us perfect), but as someone who works on the front lines of animal health care, I can usually spot interpretation mismatches pretty quickly (in others, anyway).

What Pets Keep Mum About

With that prelude in mind, here’s my top 10 list of things your pet won’t tell you:

1. I hurt. Pain is probably the No. 1 thing your pet won’t communicate directly. Sure, she may limp, chew funny or shake her head, but whining, crying and carrying on (like we humans would) isn’t her MO. Slowing down, taking the stairs more tentatively, being reluctant to jump and struggling to rise are more than likely signs of true pain — not just “old age.”

2. I’m scared. When pets get aggressive, owners often assume their pets are acting out because they’re being dominant, angry or just pain bratty. But the truth is often much simpler: They may be just plain scared. And fear must be dealt with differently — far more carefully — than other kinds of aggression. It sometimes calls for the assistance of a certified trainer or veterinary behaviorist.

3. I’m pissed off. I know it’s a vulgar thing to say, but there you have it. Cats, especially, are prone to getting PO’ed when things don’t go their way. While there can certainly be an underlying medical condition behind litterbox avoidance, it can also be a sign of pent-up resentments in kitties, especially if they don't agree with your choice of litter or have a bone to pick with the litterbox cleaning schedule.

4. I resent my housemate. Both dogs and cats can be jealous creatures. And cats are extraordinarily territorial by nature. But the signs that things are amiss between dogs and dogs or cats and cats can be incredibly subtle. So subtle that you’ll easily miss them — until it’s too late, of course, and altercations ensue. Start this conversation with your veterinarian, but this may be another instance where a certified trainer or veterinary behaviorist might be in order.

5. I need to lose weight. If there’s one subject most owners tend to overlook, it’s obesity. In fact, most of my clients are shocked when I tell them their pets are easily 20 to 50 percent overweight.

Now, your pets may not want to eat less, but they certainly don’t want to feel the effects that excess poundage brings.


Google+

Join the Conversation

Like this article? Have a point of view to share? Let us know!