Who Says Rabbits Lack Personality and Spunk?

Both Vienna and Punch have their own distinct behavior. According to Gorman and Fabian, Vienna is a bit of a diva, the dominant one of the pair. She’s very vocal (for a rabbit), grunting and honking when something displeases her, and offering murmurs and happy clucks when she’s pleased.

She’ll leave a toy in her food bowl when she’s hungry, or toss it into the litterbox when she’s not satisfied with the cleanliness factor. She also hates to be held. “I have never seen such strong personality in an animal,” says Gorman.

Punch, on the other hand, loves to be held when he’s not tearing around the house, exploring and getting into things. He went through a phase of pulling things off tables for a while, including a plate of spaghetti that landed on top of himself. “It’s tough cleaning tomato sauce off a rabbit,” observes Fabian, who has had rabbits as pets continually for about 25 years.

“Punch’s favorite thing to do — and we let him do it every day — is make the bed,” says Gorman. “He smoothes the wrinkles and straightens the blankets with such focus and energy, we are thinking of getting him a gig at the Ramada.” Gorman even documented Punch's housekeeping habit in this video.

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Who Says Rabbits Lack Personality and Spunk?

Advice for Would-Be Bunny Owners

If you get a new rabbit, how do you get to a place where the animal is comfortable enough to bond with you and show off its relaxed self?

You start slow. And you do some research. Prospective or new rabbit owners would do well to check out two guides, "9 Common Rabbit Myths" and "A 10-Point Primer for New Bunny Families," from the House Rabbit Society — along with a helpful overview video called "Rabbits, Revisited" that actress and rabbit owner Amy Sedaris narrated for the organization last year. It’s also important to keep an open mind and not generalize because every rabbit is different.

“A big thing I tell people is don’t impose yourself on the rabbit,” says Cotter. “Let the rabbit have time to learn about you, your household, your habits, the sights, the sounds, the smells and the vibrations of the house.”

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