10 Most Cat-Friendly Dog Breeds

Though not all canines want to cuddle with cats, some breeds seem more likely to find a friend in felines than others. And when it happens, it's a pretty special thing to watch — there's nothing like seeing your cat give your dog a bath or watching your pup snuggle up with his favorite kitty.

We polled 1,654 pet owners to determine which dog breeds should be on the list, and the results are in.

Cat-Friendly Dog Breeds

Dachshund dog breed

David Jensen, Animal Photography

No. 10: Dachshund

The smallest of the hounds, the Dachshund — at least, the miniature version, although he also comes in a larger standard size — might be just about the same size as your cat, but don't tell him that! This little guy has an enormous personality. He tends to be devoted, determined, willful and spirited.

Two German Shepherds outside

Ron Willbie, Animal Photography

No. 9: German Shepherd Dog

German Shepherds are typically among the most intelligent and adaptable breeds, not to mention active and athletic. Relatively easy to train, the GSD will often take her cues from you on who to like and trust, cats included.

Poodle dog breed

Stephen Taylor, Animal Photography

No. 8: Poodle

The Poodle is generally an energetic, bright and happy dog that comes in three sizes: Toy, Miniature and Standard. He loves being part of his family's life and tends to bond closely with his people.

Cocker Spaniel

Olivia Hemingway, Animal Photography

No. 7: Cocker Spaniel

Cocker Spaniels are known for being gentle and playful, along with a wagging tail and curious nature. Many are very people oriented and friendly with other dogs and cats.

Collie

Sally Anne Thompson, Animal Photography

No. 6: Collie

Affectionate and sensitive, the Collie might not be able to do everything you've seen in Lassie Come Home, but he's generally a wonderful member of the family who's happy to spread the love around to all members. Though he's likely to get along just fine with cats, he also might try to herd them — plus other dogs in the house, children and even you.

Border Collie by water

Anna Pozzi, Animal Photography

No. 5: Border Collie

If the Collie was likely to try herding other members of the family, let's call it all but a done deal with the Border Collie. Perhaps the most intelligent dog breed, she's outsmarted many a human owner. When you pair that brain with her incredibly strong herding instincts, it's not hard to picture all the neighborhood children rounded up in your front yard, is it?

Basset Hound

Sam Clark, Animal Photography

No. 4: Basset Hound

He might not be known for his tremendous obedience, but the Basset Hound's temperament is generally wonderful with other furry members of the family. He does become extremely attached to the humans in his family though, so don't plan on keeping him out in the yard when the cat comes — he'll be unhappy, and you'll be treated to a melodious (and pitiful) song.

Lemon Beagle Smiling at Camera

Leesia Teh, Animal Photography

No. 3: Beagle

The Beagle is a true scenthound and loves to use her nose. This breed can be a good choice for families due to her small to medium size and devoted, even temperament.

Labrador Retriever

Leesia Teh, Animal Photography

No. 2: Labrador Retriever

Is it any surprise that the friendly Lab is near the top of this list? Many Labs have a pretty even temperament and are likely to get along with any members of the household, including the feline variety.

Golden Retriever on bed

Leesia Teh, Animal Photography

No. 1: Golden Retriever

That friendly smile isn't just for show — it seems the Golden generally loves pretty much everyone. And this typically loyal, enthusiastic and intelligent breed deserves plenty of love in return!

Before you pick out one of these dogs, we want to mention two important things. First, you should  always supervise any cat and dog when they first meet, regardless of the dog's (or the cat's) breed. Not sure how to best do a safe introduction? Here's what you need to know.

Also, remember that each dog is an individual and his temperament is a mix of genetics, training and environment. So just because a breed makes (or even tops!) this list, it doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will be cuckoo for kitties. Always introduce new animals to one another safely and err on the side of caution. Even if they get along quickly and easily, you'll be setting the stage for a lifetime of comfortable companionship.

More on Vetstreet:

Join the Conversation

Like this article? Have a point of view to share? Let us know!