Do You Know the 10 Biggest Cat Breeds?

We often think of cats as small and lithe, but some breeds are actually quite large and can weigh up to 25 pounds. Though we don’t condone allowing cats to become fat, some breeds are just naturally bigger in size — but still healthy.

From the muscular Maine Coon to the long and large Savannah, meet 10 sizable cat breeds.

Get to Know These Large Cat Breeds

Orange Maine Coon in Basket

Leesia Teh, Animal Photography

Maine Coon

Weighing from 9 to 18 pounds, the muscular Maine Coon is certainly a larger cat. The friendly breed typically gets along with everyone, including dogs and other cats. In fact, the Maine Coon tends to be so easygoing that he might even let you walk him on a leash.

Norwegian Forest Cat

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Norwegian Forest Cat

Not to be confused with the Maine Coon, the Norwegian Forest Cat is also a large and very furry cat. The breed hails from Norway, where these cats once used their excellent mousing skills to help farmers. And though they originated from the harsh Scandinavian woods, nowadays the breed is generally far from feral. Wegies are typically low-key and mellow.

Cream Colored British Shorthair

Johnny Kruger, Animal Photography

British Shorthair

Nearly everything about the British Shorthair is round: his head, his eyes, his paws and even the tip of his tail. The solid and muscular breed is usually quiet and laid-back, with an air of dignity about them, which makes sense. They are British after all.

Chartreux cat breed

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Chartreux

Said to resemble a potato atop toothpicks, the Chartreux is one big lap cat. And when he’s not demanding to curl up on top of you, he’ll likely be following you from room to room. Though the breed is large, the Chartreux is usually quite stealthy. Don’t be surprised if he opens cabinet doors or successfully hunts mice in your home.

Bengal Cat Laying Down

Anna Pozzi, Animal Photography

Bengal

The Bengal might not be as big as the wild cats she resembles, but she’s still pretty large for a domestic cat. Her striking coat will draw plenty of admiring looks, which is exactly what this attention-loving breed wants. In fact, a Bengal will usually do just about anything to get you to interact with her, even if it means jumping on the kitchen counter or stealing your things.

Ragdoll With Blue Eyes

Leanne Graham, Animal Photography

Ragdoll

Warning: Your arms are going to be very tired after cuddling with the typically affectionate Ragdoll. These gentle lovebugs can weigh up to 20 pounds and usually prefer to be in your lap, arms or lying right beside you. They generally want to be with you at all times.

Ragamuffin cat breed

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Ragamuffin

Like his shorthaired cousin, the Ragdoll, the Ragamuffin has probably never met a lap he didn’t like. The big breed typically weighs 10 to 20 pounds, and tends to stick to his people like Velcro, following them from room to room.

Savannah, a cat breed you've probably never heard of

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Savannah

As a breed that began with a kitten whose parents were a serval (a small African wild cat) and domestic cat, it’s no surprise that the Savannah is large. The typically intelligent cat has a long body with long legs and large, tall ears that sit on the top of his head. And because he’s so smart, he usually needs plenty of mental and physical stimulation — or he’ll find a way to entertain himself.

Siberian cat

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Siberian

The Siberian sports a thick and glamorous double coat that, once upon a time, helped him survive the cold, harsh northern Russia climate. These cats also have sturdy, muscular bodies; some neutered males can weigh up to 25 pounds.

Turkish Van cat breed

Tetsu Yamazaki, Animal Photography

Turkish Van

Known as the swimming cat, the Turkish Van is a large and heavily built cat who is said to enjoy a dip in the water, which, historically, was Turkey’s Lake Van. Females tend to weigh 7 to 12 pounds, and males are typically 10 to 20 pounds. When he’s not trying to play in the kitchen sink, he’ll likely be following you around the house or trying to cuddle in your lap.

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